Origami Folding Technique

 

Squash Fold in Origami

 

 

 

Squash fold is very common folding technique in origami. So you should get familiar with this folding technique. In this tutorial, I will start with either square or balloon base to show what squash-fold is.

 

origami paper heart front side

A typical "squash fold" can be represented with one valley and one mountain-fold on the front layer and one valley-fold on the back layer. You can see the valley-fold symbol is dimmed somewhat to indicate that it is done on the back layer.

For an example, we have a model shown on the left. The top one is the square base and the bottom one is the balloon base.

If you see these symbols, then you should apply the following steps #1-5 to complete the squash fold.

 

origami paper heart back side

1.

We want to apply "squash fold" to both models.

 

First, prepare to apply half-valley fold. The typical valley-fold means 180 degrees folding of a paper. Here half-valley fold means 90 degrees folding of paper so that you stop the folding in the middle so that a flap sticks out in space.

 

This will be shown in the step #2.

 

origami paper heart back side

2.

Apply 90 degrees valley-fold.

 

You can see the flap sticks out at the middle of the model.

 

Prepare to squash the flab.

 

 

origami paper heart back side

3.

Let's start to squash the flap.

 

 

 

origami paper heart back side

4.

Be sure to make the left and right sides to be symmetrical before finalizing the crease lines.

 

 

origami paper heart back side

5.

Now, the squash fold is completed.

 

In a typical diagram, only one mountain-fold and one valley-fold are given (shown in (A)) and you should be able to apply the squash-fold to get to the picture shown in (B).

 

So if you encounter a diagram with a symbol of one valley-fold and one mountain-fold on the front layer and one valley-fold on the back layer, then it is the "squash-fold".

 

 

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